Diet Myths with our Corporate Dietitian

Diet myths with Gemma Monaghan, Corporate Dietitian

When it comes to diet, nutrition and cooking, everyone is an expert!

In a world full of misinformation, it can be hard to find the right information and make the right choice.  When it comes to food and eating healthy, we all know what we need to do, but sometimes new diets come up in mainstream media that we see and need to understand.

Our guest, Gemma Monaghan is an accredited practising Dietitian, with qualifications in low FODMAPs and spends her working week educating corporates on all things nutrition.

In Episode 11 of Well Workplaces Podcast, our guest Gemma shares her insights on:

  • Her journey into Dietetics and Nutrition and love for cooking
  • What Intermittent Fasting is all about and the pros and cons
  • How Keto diet is one of diets she talks with clients about
  • Alternative milks and there nutritional value
  • The future trends in food, dining and nutrition

This was an interesting conversation with some great science to back it up.

About us:

Well Workplaces is a movement by Pinnacle Health Group.  Our vision is for a world where workplaces lead and create healthier communities.  Well Workplaces podcast has been designed to create genuine wellbeing conversations in the workplace and share expert knowledge in practical ways.

Connect with Well Workplaces on LinkedIn or connect with hosts Tom Bosna and Josh Lambert and we would love your feedback so please rate us on Apple podcast so we can be of service to you.

Is resistance training the best anti-ageing intervention on the planet?

Is resistance training the best anti-ageing intervention with Senior Physiotherapist, Riain Casey


We have all seen Physiotherapists for many different reasons. Sometimes, it’s simply for pain relief and other times it’s for rehabilitation of an injured area. For modern day health practitioners, though, there is a growing body of evidence that points towards the benefits of exercise therapy in maintaining optimal health and preventing a range of chronic diseases. In fact, almost 25% of the worlds adults are classified as physically inactive – it’s a big issue! It’s also interesting that almost everyone knows that exercise is good for them, but some of us simply don’t get enough movement in our day.

This is where our expert Riain Casey comes in.  Riain is the definition of a modern-day health practitioner that sees his role as a Physiotherapist, as much more than pain relief. In fact, he defines his purpose as to facilitate movement through physical activity promotion.

The big question for Riain is: How should we train and why?

In Episode 5 of the Well Workplaces Podcast, Riain Casey drops so many knowledge bombs on all things resistance training and physical wellbeing.

  • Riain shares his journey from Ireland to Australia and his experience in treating people in various lie stages from couch potato, to athletes, corporate and elderly.
  • He shares a story about realising the huge benefits of strength training during University and how he worked with one of Irelands most respected strength and conditioning groups to learn his craft.
  • Riain discusses how resistance training in its basic form can be done by most of us with very little equipment
  • He talks about the top five ingredients for any resistance programs
  • He shares the analogy that resistance training is the best anti-ageing cream going around and all the amazing benefits
  • Riain talks about how in 2020, he has had to adapt and pivot in his Physiotherapy role and how soft skills and exercise prescription have allowed him to navigate telehealth and corporate programmes

This was such a detailed and passionate discussion between Riain and Tom that I think you’ll agree that we should unpack further topics from this man.

To connect with Riain Casey please head across to @the_phit_physio on Instagram and follow his great content and expert tips on all things wellbeing and physical health.

About us:

Well Workplaces is a movement by Pinnacle Health Group.  Our vision is for a world where workplaces lead and create healthier communities.  Well Workplaces podcast has been designed to create genuine wellbeing conversations in the workplace and share expert knowledge in practical ways.

Connect with Well Workplaces on LinkedIn or connect with hosts Tom Bosna and Josh Lambert and we would love your feedback so please rate us on Apple podcast so we can be of service to you.

Pain between your shoulder blades?

Pain between your shoulder blades? Pain spreading up into your neck? Occasional dull headaches?

Do you suffer from a constant dull nagging ache in the middle of your back that spreads up your neck? It is likely that you are experiencing a condition known as thoracic dysfunction. This is common in office workers who spend too much time in a sustained position.

The most common cause of thoracic back pain is inflammation of the muscles or soft tissues of the thoracic spine. This inflammation can occur for a number of reasons:

  • Sitting or standing in a slouched position over time
  • Sitting or standing for a long time at a computer
  • Lack of muscular strength – mainly core or shoulder instability
  • A sudden sprain or strain (as in car accidents or sports injuries)
  • Stress

Treatment:

  • Manual therapy
  • Soft tissue massage
  • Dry Needling
  • Postural retraining
  • Activity modification
  • Strengthening exercises
  • Reformer Pilates

The good news is that the majority of people respond very well with Physiotherapy. If this sounds like you or one of your colleague’s then book an assessment today with one of our Physiotherapists at the Wellness Centre.

3 reasons why you should add strength training to your running program

Back in the day, if you wanted to become a better runner you would simply run, and then run some more!

While this can be a useful strategy to some extent…

More and more, we now see recreational runners all the way to elite-level runners incorporating strength training into their weekly training routine and the outcomes have been impressive.

So here’s why you should be adding strength training into your training schedule…

Improved Running Economy —

This is defined as the oxygen uptake required at a given sub-maximal running velocity (1). In other words, the better your running economy (RE), the less oxygen you need to maintain your running pace.

In recent studies, both strength and resistance training have been shown to be effective means of improving RE in all levels of runners (1,2). So yes, even the weekend warrior can supplement their running with some resistance exercise and reap the rewards.

The great thing is, these demonstrated benefits don’t require months to years to attain but only several weeks before these changes can be achieved (3,4).

Improved Running Performance —

This is typically defined by the parameters of VO2 max, maximal anaerobic running velocity and power generation, which have all been shown to significantly improve in conjunction with a sound strength training programme.

In a few recent studies, direct improvements have been shown not only in short to intermediate distances but longer distances as well (e.g. 1,500 to 10,000 m) (2,4,5).

Once again, these changes in running performance were achieved in as little as two to three strength-training sessions per week (6).

Reduction in Running-related Injuries —

It’s difficult to determine the injury risk in running, due to so many potential variables at play. What we can do is take the data we have from common running injuries involving the knee, Achilles, shin and hip and consider the similarities among them, with one of the most prominent being reductions in strength.

Also, if we consider the main interventions in the management of running-related injuries, exercises focused on building strength, endurance and power have been highly considered first-line and recommended treatment (7,8,9,10).

We know running places considerable loads through our body, with the foot and ankle required to withstand loads of 6-8x our body weight at a jogging pace (11). In order to improve the body’s ability to handle these loads, we need to ensure we have sufficient capacity in the muscles attenuating the loads. What better way to do this than with a resistance training routine tailored to your running requirements?

Takeaways

Adding in 2-3 resistance training sessions into your running can improve running economy, running performance and make you more injury resilient. The benefits associated with resistance training can be seen in just weeks.

Apply this now by adding in some exercises into your training routine, focusing on key muscles involved in running such as: calf complex, hamstrings, quadriceps and hip stabilisers to improve physical capacity.

Thanks for reading.

Want to find out more about how strength training can optimise your running? Please feel free to reach out to me at luka@pinnaclehealthgroup.com.au or book a consultation with a Physiotherapist.

  1. Balsalobre-Fernandez C et al. (2016) Effects of strength training on running economy in highly trained runners: a systematic review with meta-analysis of controlled trials. J Strength Cond Rest, 30(8):2361-8
  2. Yamamoto LM et al. (2018) The effects of resistance training on endurance distance running performance among highly trained runners: a systematic review. J Strength Cond Res; 22(6):2036-44
  3. Denadai BS et al. (2017) Explosive training and heavy weight training are effective for improving running economy in endurance athletes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Sports Med, 47(3):545-554
  4. Alcaraz-Ilbanez M & Rodriquez-Perez M (2018) Effects of resistance training on performance in previously trained endurance runners: a systematic review. J Sports Sci, 36(6):613-629
  5. Beattie K et al. (2014) The effects of strength training on performance in endurance athletes. Sports Med, 44(6):845-65
  6. Blagrove RC et al. (2018) Effects of strength training on the physiological determinants of middle- and long-distance running performance: a systematic review. Sports Med, 48(5):1117-1149
  7. Zouita S et al. (2016) Strength training reduces injury rate in elite young soccer players during one season. J Strength Cond Res, 30(5): 1295-307
  8. Santos TR et al. (2015) Effectiveness of hip muscle strengthening in patellofemoral pain syndrome patients: a systematic review. Braz J Phys Ther, 19(3):167-76
  9. Esculier JF et al (2018) Predictors of clinical success in runners with patellofemoral pain: secondary analyses of a randomized clinical trial. J Sci Med Sports, 21(8): 777-782
  10. Van der Vlist AC et al. (2019) Clinical risk factors for Achilles tendinopathy: a systematic review. Br J Sports Med
  11. Dorn DW et al. (2012) Muscular strategy shift in human running: dependence of running speed on hip and ankle muscle performance. J. Exp. Biol. 215, 1944-1956